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Jamaica Ackee Scramble

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Why not Ackee Scramble? Because sometimes you want something different than eggs.

Jamaica Ackee can Beauty and the Beets

What is Jamaican Ackee?

I first learned about using the fruit ackee while studying for my Forks Over Knives certification– ackee is actually the national fruit of Jamaica. Ackee is very common in Jamaican cuisine and is especially popular when paired with salted codfish and bread. It is so common now that I have found it canned at my local Publix grocery store in the International aisle, and it’s readily available on Amazon.

Vegan Jamaica Ackee Scramble Beauty and the Beets

It’s like an egg but it’s not an egg

So I made an ackee scramble. The fruit itself is very reminiscent of a scrambled egg – similar in texture, looks and even taste. For the Vegan eater, ackee is an excellent substitute for eggs and can easily replace the tofu in a scramble. And ackee is more nutritious than tofu- ackee is packed with niacin, Vitamin C, potassium and iron. While it does not contain the same amount of protein as an egg, it also does not have cholesterol like that of an egg. As a matter of fact, ackee contains no cholesterol but is packed with good fatty acids like palmitic acid (palm oil).

Jamaica Ackee canned Beauty and the Beets

Ackee is not cheap

However, the fruit is not cheap – I paid $9 for a 19-oz. can. The only ackee I could find was also the kind that was soaked in a salt water brine, so I avoided adding any additional salt to my dish.

Ackee Scramble turmeric Beauty and the Beets

Making an Ackee Scramble is easy!!

I picked up a can and decided to test its ability to mock a scrambled egg. And I was not disappointed with my ackee scramble. The fruit really does cook like an egg and pairs well with vegetables, herbs and spices. Very easy to work with.

Ackee Scramble with turmeric Beauty and the Beets

Should you not be able to find ackee in your local market, you can either purchase it online or substitute riced cauliflower, firm tofu or real scrambled eggs into this recipe. (Try this recipe for Scrambled Tofu with Peppers and Mushrooms)

Jamaica Ackee Scramble bowls Beauty and the Beets

Jamaica Ackee Scramble

Jamaica Ackee Scramble

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 14 minutes
Total Time: 19 minutes

Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica. It can be found in select grocery stores or ordered*online*.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a saute pan over medium high heat, add the green pepper, onion, and tomatoes. Stir the veggies, adding the vegetable broth as needed to keep the veggies from sticking to the pan. Continue to stir 3-4 minutes until the onions begin to turn translucent.
  2. Add the ackee and cook an additional 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the black pepper, turmeric, paprika, garlic, amino acids and nutritional yeast to the pan. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  4. Serve immediately.

Notes

Ackee can be substituted with riced caulifower, firm tofu or eggs.

Did you make this recipe?

Share it on Instagram and mention @beautyandthebeets or tag #beautyandthebeets. I would love to see what you made!

Also check out my recipe for Jamaica Ackee and Saltfish

If you are interested in learning more about the plant based certification class I took, visit the Rouxbe plant based class page here. Or for a more affordable option, sign up for a monthly membership to the Rouxbe cooking school here. (This post is NOT sponsored by the Rouxbe Cooking School by the way).

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Beauty and the Beets Jamaica Ackee Scramble

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